Advocating Is Easier Than You Think - Chantalle Couba

Photo by Sam Balye on Unsplash

Cetera’s Chantalle Couba and John Pierce joined the podcast The Cannon Curve, hosted by Phil Buchanan of Cannon Financial Institute, to discuss the importance of diversity and inclusion in the financial services industry, and how fostering greater opportunity for all isn’t just the right thing to do — it’s also key to driving growth.

Chantalle Couba is a motivated executive-level advisor with substantial in-house and advisory financial services experience, including operational risk and human capital strategy. A solutions driven strategist, she has enjoyed working with multiple Fortune 20 corporations within the private sector. Her background ranges from product strategy formation, performing revenue opportunity analysis, delivering regulatory analysis in support of strategic and responsive regulatory planning, executing regulatory mandates, optimizing sales force effectiveness, managing talent, organizational design, to developing and accelerating operating model frameworks.

In this section of the podcast, Chantalle responds to a comment made ‘Black advisors should go to Black high-schools’ and she discusses the importance of the youth seeing and interacting with people who do not look like them.

“I think that comment comes from a genuine desire to help. It’s about letting an African-American or Black student or non-white student see that you have an interest in showing them what your office looks like, and what you do everyday, and how much you can earn long-term in this field, how you are committed to growing and developing people in your practice and so on. Further, what does it mean to see that from someone who doesn’t look like you? That is the definition of advocacy and sponsorship. It’s really impactful when someone who doesn’t look like you, comes to you and says ‘who cares, I just want to see you succeed’. I hope and believe that that’s where we are in this time, and among the forward looking professionals in our field.

“I think we recognize that America is a country of immigrants, and it is a country of diverse people woven together. As we evolve and grow into a global view, we realize that we are more alike than not. Having an opportunity to sit and be near someone and share something with someone that you wouldn’t normally have access to. Being intentional about that, the gains that one can make into their practice, community, and industry, are all tremendous.”

A point of view is the angle of considering things. It’s a platform for people with a vision and a story to tell.